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Dog Controls

The Council adopted a Public Space Protection Order (PSPO) which came into force on 21 October 2017 and will last for three years.

The PSPO replaces the Dog Control Orders that were introduced on 1 April 2013. 

Dog Controls cover:

Maximum of Six Dogs

Means to Pick Up Dog Fouling

Dog Fouling

Dog Exclusions

Dogs on Leads

Dogs on Leads by Direction

The controls help make sure that we can all enjoy clean and safe public places by balancing the needs of dog owners with those of other residents. They are simple, fair rules, which should be easy to follow.

Where the rules are broken an offence is committed. Offenders may be issued with a Fixed Penalty Notice for £100, or receive a fine of up to £1,000 from a magistrate.

Exemptions

The Orders do not apply to registered blind people and their guide dogs or to dogs registered with Dogs for the Disabled, Support Dogs and Canine Partners for Independence, on-duty police dogs and search and rescue dogs.

 

Dog Fouling Offences

It is an offence for an owner to allow their dog to foul any public place and not immediately remove the waste. These controls apply to almost all public places such as grass verges, pavements, churchyards and public open spaces.

Dog owners should carry a poop-scoop or other means with which to pick up and dispose of their dog's waste. Fouling controls apply whether or not there are signs or dog bins in the area. The Council is committed to placing more fouling bins in areas regularly used by dog walkers, however, where no bins are present dog owners should dispose of fouling in their domestic refuse bin. Dog waste bins

Reporting a fouling offence

Dog wardens do not currently carry out routine dog fouling patrols but will  spend time in areas where we have dog fouling complaints. 
To report a problem site contact us or phone 01782 717717

What we do

  • The details you provide will be passed to the dog warden
  • Where possible, wardens will patrol the problem area at the times you suggest
  • If we witness an offence we will approach the offender and issue them with a fixed penalty notice (FPN). We do not take this step based on third party evidence alone
  • If we meet a dog walker, but don’t witness an offence, we will remind them of their obligations to clear up after their dog
  • Where we have detailed information which identifies a dog owner as a possible offender, we will contact the dog owner by letter, treating this information in good faith.

What you can do

If you would like to encourage dog owners to clean up after their dog, you can download and display a Dog Controls Sign (PDF 994kb). Our customer services staff can also print this sign for you on request. You can attach a sign to your property – such as a wall or gate, display it in a window, or work with other residents to use community noticeboards and newsletters to promote responsible dog ownership.

If you saw a dog fouling offence take place and you can identify the dog’s owner, we may be able to take action based on what you’ve seen. We need you to provide a detailed account of what you witnessed and may need you to confirm these details in a magistrates' court. If you are willing to support us with such action please complete and submit our Summary of witness information form (PDF 220KB).

 

Dog Exclusions

What it means

Dog walkers cannot take their dog into certain places – even if they have it on a lead.

Where it applies

Dogs are excluded from the following areas:

  • Fenced or enclosed children’s play areas signed at its entrance(s) as a “dog exclusion area” which are designated and marked for children’s play
  • Fenced or enclosed games areas such as tennis and ball courts, multisport areas, skate parks
  • The grassed portion of all bowling greens
  • Fishing pools managed by angling clubs as per their signs
  • Fenced or enclosed portions of Apedale Country Park - signed at its entrance(s) as a “dog exclusion area” which are designated for wildlife conservation
  • Open space owned by parish and town councils signed at its entrance(s) as a “dog exclusion area”.

These areas have been chosen because the presence of a dog, however well behaved, could cause problems and, on balance, we feel it would be better that the dog was not there.

The sites we have selected are all relatively small and have a fence around them. They have a limited number of entrances where appropriate signs can be displayed.

Children’s play areas - these are fenced compounds with children’s play equipment such as a slide or swings. These areas are designed for young children, who may be intimidated by the presence of a dog. Play equipment may also potentially injure a dog.
 

 

Games areas, such as tennis and ball courts, multisport areas, skate parks -  these are enclosed sites, usually for older children or adults, which are designed for a specific purpose. If the area is in use, a dog may disrupt its use or there may be a chance of it being injured. Certain activities can  excite dogs and can result in them acting unpredictably.

List of sites where dogs are excluded

Apedale Country Park  - some parts of Apedale Country Park are specifically managed for nature conservation and some areas have livestock. Dogs are excluded from the following key locations. Each of these sites is fenced and a sign will be displayed at entrances to the site.

  • Lapwing paddock – to protect ground nesting birds
  • Hornbeam paddock one and two – for the safety of livestock
  • Conservation/pond dipping area adjacent to visitor/energy centre, off Blackbank Road
  • Conservation/pond dipping area adjacent to Apedale Heritage Centre, off Loomer Road
     

Dogs on leads controls also apply to some areas in the park. In total these cover only a small portion of the site. In all remaining areas, dogs can be exercised off the lead, but remember that fouling controls still apply.

Open space owned by parish and town councils - in addition to open spaces owned and maintained by the Council, there are a number of other places which are owned and managed by parish councils. Parishes set their own rules about how spaces can be used. We have a number of sites where, for the benefit of other parishioners, it's felt that dogs should be excluded.

Examples include: Harrison Close playing field (Audley Parish Council) and Whitmore Village Hall sports field (Whitmore Parish Council)

 

 

 

Dogs On Leads

Requires dogs to be on a lead in specific places

What it means

Dog walkers must keep their dog/s on a short lead (no longer than two metres) when they walk it in certain places

Where does it apply?

Dogs must be kept on a lead when being walked in the following areas:

  •  Bradwell Crematorium, churchyards, cemeteries and closed churchyards
  •  Formal gardens
  •  Marked out sports pitches
  •  Unfenced children’s play equipment and a portion of the playing fields, extending 20 metres in all directions from it.
  •  Fenced/enclosed portions of Apedale Country Park signed at its entrance(s) as a “dogs on leads area” which are designated for wildlife conservation
  •  The northern section of Bathpool Park, from its entrance and car park at Boathorse Road, along the main access path which runs from the car park at Boathorse Road, adjacent to the children’s play area - and - rugby pitches to its junction with footpath 146 which crosses the dam   wall.
  • Paths which adjoin Bathpool reservoir's main fishing pool and continue along the eastern side of the reservoir
  • Public rights of way: Kidsgrove 130 to the reservoir embankment 144, 146 and 182. (Link to map)
  • Fishing pools managed by angling clubs as per their signs
  • Open space owned by parish and town councils as per their signs

 

Why is it necessary?

We believe there are times when a dog should be able to be exercised off the lead and other times when it needs to be under close control. In certain places dogs need to be kept on a lead for their safety and the safety of others using that public place.

By keeping a dog on a lead there is less chance of dogs fighting and causing concern to others. Our evidence suggests that fewer fouling offences happen when dogs are kept on leads.

Why have we chosen these areas?

These are areas where it is essential that dogs are kept under control for the safety of others using the area.

Churchyards and cemeteries - in many cases we feel that dog owners should be able to take their dog into/through these areas, provided it is kept under control. Keeping a dog on a lead is a mark of respect, and minimises the risk of accidental damage to floral tributes, or urination on headstones. Dogs have previously been excluded from many of these sites.

Formal gardens - we welcome residents with dogs to our formal parks such as Queen Elizabeth Park (Pool Dam), Queen's Gardens (Ironmarket), Chesterton Park and Clough Hall Park but ask that dogs do not run free in the planted areas.

Many residents take pleasure from our award-winning landscaping and we ask that owners keep their dogs on a lead while walking through these planted areas to prevent accidental damage.

We would also ask residents to place their dog on a lead if walking through Oaklands Park, Porthill. This is to minimise the risk of injury to waterfowl.

Marked out sports grounds, and pitches - because of the way these grassed areas are used, it is essential that they are kept as clean and safe as possible. Unfortunately, we continue to find that some residents allow their dogs to foul these areas and then do not remove the waste. We consider this unacceptable.

While we have chosen not to ban dogs from these areas we ask that they be exercised on a lead when on a marked out football or rugby pitch, so as to ensure that dog fouling can always be removed.

Playing fields containing unfenced children’s play equipment - in most cases where we have play equipment for young children, it is contained within a fenced compound. We believe that dogs should be kept away from the play equipment itself, and those using it. However where play equipment does not have a perimeter fence immediately surrounding it, we would ask dog walkers to place their dogs on a lead when they are within 20 metres of it.

 

List of sites where dogs must be kept on a lead

Apedale Country Park - some parts of Apedale Country Park are specifically managed for nature conservation and some areas hold livestock. Dogs need to be kept on a lead in the following places - Whitebarn Paddock and adjacent nature area off Blackbank Road. Also, dog exclusions apply to some areas in this park. In total these cover only a small part of the site. In all remaining areas, dogs can be exercised off the lead.

Bathpool Park - dog owners should keep their dog on a lead while walking along the main access path which runs from the car park at Boathorse Road, adjacent to the children’s play area and rugby pitch, to the bridge by the reservoir embankment and along the eastern side of the reservoir, adjacent to the railway line. This is a busy thoroughfare used by cyclists and families with young children. Dogs should also be on a lead if exercised on any of the sports pitches. In addition, dog exclusions apply to the children’s play areas in the park. In total these cover only a small part of the site. In all remaining areas, dogs may be exercised off the lead. If there are anglers using the pool then please keep your dog under close control until you have passed them. (Link to map)

Public Footpaths - dogs must be kept on a lead or under close control on  public footpaths, usually those which cross farmland. Staffordshire County Council marks these with a sign on the footpath marker post.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Open space owned by parish and town councils

In addition to open spaces owned and maintained by the Council, there are a number of other places which are owned and managed by parish councils. Parishes set their own rules about how spaces can be used. We have a number of locations where, for the benefit of other parishioners, they feel dogs should be kept on leads. Examples include: Alsagers Bank playing fields, Bignall End Road/Tibb Street public open space, Queens Street/Deans View playing fields and Scott Hay playing fields, all within Audley parish - and Jubilee Gardens, Fair Green Road and Waters Edge Estate within Whitmore parish.

 

You can still let your dog off the lead in parks and open spaces. We know it's important for dogs to have places where they can run about and socialise with other dogs.

Dogs can be off the lead in large areas of most public parks such as Brampton Park, Clough Hall, Lyme Valley, Bathpool, Apedale, Bateswood, Birchenwood and the Wammy and on common land such as Wolstanton Marsh. However, owners are still required to clean up if their dog fouls - so they must make sure they can see their dog at all times.

Follow this link for a list of sites where dogs must be kept on a lead

 

Dogs on Leads by Direction

Requires dogs to be placed on a lead when requested to do so by an authorised officer.

What does it mean?

Officers such as dog wardens, park rangers, police officers and PCSOs can tell dog walkers to put their dog on a lead if they feel it is necessary for the safety of the dog or to safeguard others. If you fail to follow their instructions, they can issue a fixed penalty notice.

Where does it apply?

All public places. It includes, but is not limited to, all footpaths, the footways and carriageway of every highway (including tree bases and grass verges) and every cemetery, park, public garden, children’s play area and open space including land owned by the borough, parish and town councils.

Why is it necessary?

An owner may be asked to place their dog on a lead if the officer has witnessed it acting aggressively, or believes that the owner would not otherwise be able to keep it under proper control.

Owners may also be asked to place their dog on a lead when attending events where there are large numbers of people and other dogs.

We may ask for your co-operation to place your dog on a lead to protect wildlife and livestock.

This control means that we can reduce the number of locations where dogs would otherwise always have to be walked on a lead – for example we may ask dog walkers to place their dog on a lead if attending a fun day event in our parks. At other times dogs may be exercised off the lead.

 

Maximum of Six Dogs

We consider that if a person walks more than six dogs they will not be able to keep them all under proper control. The risk that they will not notice, or be able to remove, fouling increases. It is more likely that larger groups of dogs will behave as a pack. Other park users - including walkers, family groups, runners and cyclists - often report feeling intimidated by groups of dogs.

Locations where this order applies -

Apedale Country Park

Bateswood Country Park

Bathpool Park

Clough Hall Park

Silverdale Country Park

Lyme Valley Parkway

Birchenwood Country Park

 

 

Means to Pick Up Dog Fouling

Anyone walking a dog in a public place is obliged to clean up after their dog. This control requires a dog's owner to prove, if asked, they have a bag with them so are able to pick up after their dog.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Last updated 7 February 2019

 
 
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